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Kitaro Omiyage Cakes
From Three Steps Over Japan:
When I visited the Kitaro goods shop in Chofu, I decided to pick up two boxes of snacks for 600-700 yen each. As is the case for all snacks of this type, they’re kind of like plain sponge cakes with little real redeeming flavors. You’re really getting these for the box art as reminders of your trip somewhere.
The box on the right is “yokai ninjyo yaki” (baked monster figures), and the one on the left is “Oyaji Sagashi” (Find Kitaro’s father). The ninjyo yaki are baked cakes with red bean paste inside, in the shapes of Neko Musume, Nezumi Otoko, Kitaro, and a few others. Kind of dry. Best with hot tea. With Oyaji Sagashi, you have 12 wrapped “chiffon cakes” (vanilla sponge cakes with cream filling) and one of them has a sticker with Oyaji on the bottom. You “win” if you’re the one that picks the cake with the sticker on the wrapper.
Read the article: Kitaro Omiyage Cakes
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gegege-no-blog:

Kitaro Omiyage Cakes
From Three Steps Over Japan:
When I visited the Kitaro goods shop in Chofu, I decided to pick up two boxes of snacks for 600-700 yen each. As is the case for all snacks of this type, they’re kind of like plain sponge cakes with little real redeeming flavors. You’re really getting these for the box art as reminders of your trip somewhere.
The box on the right is “yokai ninjyo yaki” (baked monster figures), and the one on the left is “Oyaji Sagashi” (Find Kitaro’s father). The ninjyo yaki are baked cakes with red bean paste inside, in the shapes of Neko Musume, Nezumi Otoko, Kitaro, and a few others. Kind of dry. Best with hot tea. With Oyaji Sagashi, you have 12 wrapped “chiffon cakes” (vanilla sponge cakes with cream filling) and one of them has a sticker with Oyaji on the bottom. You “win” if you’re the one that picks the cake with the sticker on the wrapper.
Read the article: Kitaro Omiyage Cakes
Zoom Info
gegege-no-blog:

Kitaro Omiyage Cakes
From Three Steps Over Japan:
When I visited the Kitaro goods shop in Chofu, I decided to pick up two boxes of snacks for 600-700 yen each. As is the case for all snacks of this type, they’re kind of like plain sponge cakes with little real redeeming flavors. You’re really getting these for the box art as reminders of your trip somewhere.
The box on the right is “yokai ninjyo yaki” (baked monster figures), and the one on the left is “Oyaji Sagashi” (Find Kitaro’s father). The ninjyo yaki are baked cakes with red bean paste inside, in the shapes of Neko Musume, Nezumi Otoko, Kitaro, and a few others. Kind of dry. Best with hot tea. With Oyaji Sagashi, you have 12 wrapped “chiffon cakes” (vanilla sponge cakes with cream filling) and one of them has a sticker with Oyaji on the bottom. You “win” if you’re the one that picks the cake with the sticker on the wrapper.
Read the article: Kitaro Omiyage Cakes
Zoom Info

gegege-no-blog:

Kitaro Omiyage Cakes

From Three Steps Over Japan:

When I visited the Kitaro goods shop in Chofu, I decided to pick up two boxes of snacks for 600-700 yen each. As is the case for all snacks of this type, they’re kind of like plain sponge cakes with little real redeeming flavors. You’re really getting these for the box art as reminders of your trip somewhere.

The box on the right is “yokai ninjyo yaki” (baked monster figures), and the one on the left is “Oyaji Sagashi” (Find Kitaro’s father). The ninjyo yaki are baked cakes with red bean paste inside, in the shapes of Neko Musume, Nezumi Otoko, Kitaro, and a few others. Kind of dry. Best with hot tea. With Oyaji Sagashi, you have 12 wrapped “chiffon cakes” (vanilla sponge cakes with cream filling) and one of them has a sticker with Oyaji on the bottom. You “win” if you’re the one that picks the cake with the sticker on the wrapper.

Read the article: Kitaro Omiyage Cakes

gegege-no-blog:

Happy 92nd Birthday to Shigeru Mizuki!!!

Exert from Hyakumonogatari.com:

Shigeru Mizuki is 92 years old today. (A day early, I know. But March 8th falls a day earlier in Japan.) On his last birthday, he was already hailed as the world’s oldest working comic book artist. He still holds that title—just another year older.

And yes, I do mean “working” comic book artist. Last year in December he announced his new comic, Watashi no Hibi (My Everyday). He also launched a new book this February touting his love of life and hamburgers and junk food called If You Go Ahead and Eat, You’ll Be Happy – The Daily Life of the Mizuki Brothers. In a recent interview, when asked if he had any doubts about taking on new work at his advanced age, Mizuki thought about it for only a brief second and replied:

“That’s something I really can’t understand. Why doubt yourself? It feels so much better to be proud—to have confidence.

I’m 91 years old, but I’m not finished yet. I’m still bursting with dreams.”

That’s beautiful.

There is no word I can think of that encapsulates Japan feels about Shigeru Mizuki other than “beloved.” He is, to the country, a sort of living Buddha; an embodiment of joy and happiness and imagination. In 2010 he was officially recognized by the Japanese government as a Person of Cultural Merit. In 2012, a TV show called Gegege no Nyobo portrayed the romantic story of how he met his wife through an arranged marriage and how they fell in love anyways.

Like Osamu Tezuka and Hayao Miyazaki, he is one of those rare individuals who shapes the fantasy dreams of an entire country. (I might even say that while Tezuka shaped Japan’s dreams of the future, Mizuki shapes its dreams of the past. And Miyazaki its present.) The only conceivable American equivalent I could conceive of might be Walt Disney when he was a living man and not a corporation. Or JRR Tolkien, if he were less academic. Or Willy Wonka if he were real.

“Come with me and you’ll see, a world of pure imagination …”

For more on the life and achievements of Shigeru Mizuki, read the full article: Happy 92nd Birthday Shigeru Mizuki!!!

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